Annual fall ‘General Membership’ meeting a success

Spike checks through the 'fore sale' records during during the social hour — which really last two hours every meeting.

Spike checks through the ‘fore sale’ records during during the social hour — which really last two hours every meeting.

That’s all for this year folks. Thanks for coming to the meetings. I had a great time and I know you did, too. Next year’s meeting schedule is posted just to the right –>.

The venue for the Maine meetings will get ironed out over the winter. As you can see, all meetings will be on Sundays in 2017. We’ll also be working on an online club directory in the new year so we can all get a better idea of what we collect. That way, we can all be on the lookout for good records for each other.

Starting in April 2017, we’ll have a door prize of $25 at every meeting to be used towards dinner, afterwards.

Let’s shake the trees over the winter months and find some new members and also keep in touch with all our current ones through the cold and snowy days ahead.

Stay in the groove,
TROY R. BENNETT, President NESPRS

An unusual record label out off Massachusetts.

An unusual record label out off Massachusetts.

Spike (left) and Warren share a laugh.

Spike (left) and Warren share a laugh.

David takes a closer look.

David takes a closer look.

Glen shows off a record with an extra hole. Do you know why?

Glen shows off a record with an extra hole. Do you know why?

A Vogue picture disc that went at auction today.

A Vogue picture disc that went at auction today.

Henry had books for auction items at this meeting. Reading about records is almost as fun as listening to them.

Henry had books for auction items at this meeting. Reading about records is almost as fun as listening to them.

Jerry sells at auction.

Jerry sells at auction.

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Bones And Grooves: The Weird Secret History Of Soviet X-Ray Music, via NPR

Western music may have been changing the world in the 1950s, but if you happened to be in Russia you were out of luck. State censorship was in full effect in the Soviet Union, and sneaking in, say, an American rock record was close to impossible. But a few industrious music fans managed to find another way.

Stephen Coates, the leader of a British band called The Real Tuesday Weld, happened on this secret history by accident. Several years ago on a tour stop in St. Petersburg, he was strolling through a flea market when a strange item caught his eye.

“I thought, ‘Is that a record? Or is it an X-ray?’ I picked it up, and it seemed to be both,” he recounts. “They guy whose stall it was was a bit dismissive — I think he wanted me to buy something else. But I brought it back to London, and I was fascinated by it. So I started to dig, and that has led me on a very strange journey.”

Coates is now an obsessive of what is nicknamed “bone music” — makeshift LPs etched into used X-rays, which were playable on a turntable and provided a fitting disguise for their contraband contents. He’s collected his findings in a new book called X-Ray Audio: The Strange Story of Soviet Music on the Bone, and he joined NPR’s Michel Martin to talk about it. READ MORE

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‘Why the Mountains Are Black’ aims to show music as a ‘tool for survival’, via LA Times

In summer 2014, four writers and one record collector were sitting in a room in Faber, Va. The record collector, an adept and passionate scholar, was Chris King. He had been playing 78s from his collection, which he keeps in plain brown sleeves that are not marked. They are organized by genre and region, and King not only knows which record is where, despite the lack of markings, but what the matrix number on the label is before he pulls it out of the sleeve.

On that July night, after a generous amount of bourbon and American blues, he played a song called “Kalamatianos.” The performers are listed as K. Bournelis, F. Tsilikos and Christos Kantilas, and the English translation of the title is “Dance of Kalamata.” It was originally issued in a 78 rpm format on CO-DG-195 with a control matrix of W.G.-308 and was recorded in Athens in 1932. The musicians were Greek, from the Peloponnese.

King sat back in his chair, behind his Technics turntable, acting as both radio DJ and preacher. He was wearing a sleeveless undershirt and tortoise-shell glasses. He put the needle down on the record and then laid several fragments of toothpicks on top of the headshell, to push the needle slightly deeper into the grooves and withdraw as much information as possible.

The song we heard is now the first track on “Why the Mountains Are Black,” a new compilation of Greek village music produced by King and released by Jack White’s label, Third Man Records.

What he played made two of us sit up straight. It was a crackly old record, and it sounded entirely un-Western, but something was familiar. One of the people in the room with me was the novelist Hari Kunzru. At the same time, we looked at each other and said, “Is that a 303?”

That’s the model number of a rudimentary bass synthesizer and sequencer made by Roland. We were, in fact, hearing a frame drum and the woodwind sound of two zournas being played in 1932, so, no, it wasn’t. But we weren’t entirely off. It wasn’t just how steady and metronomic the timekeeping was — the keening, instrumental song was pushing us into a state we already knew, for other reasons. READ MORE

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Victor Victrola Automatic Changer VE 10-35 X Ten Thirty Five circa 1928

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Record Manufacturing “Command Performance” 1942 RCA

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Django Reinhardt: 1939

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Jack Teagarden: “Dark Eyes”

 

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